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India Couture Week 2017: Anamika Khanna’s Collection Is For The Neoteric Yet Traditional Bride

India Couture Week 2017: Anamika Khanna’s Collection Is For The Neoteric Yet Traditional Bride

Celebrating their 10th year, FDCI kick started India Couture Week yesterday in Delhi, with Anamika Khanna’s grandiose offsite show titled Luxury 2017 at the Kila, Mehrauli. The seven-day extravagant affair that will go on until the 30th of July will be showcasing 14 of the country’s best couturiers from the industry.

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Pic Credit: FDCI (Instagram)

Taking forward from last year’s couture collection where Khanna showcased models as live installations, this time around the designer par excellence displayed her creations on mannequins with the installations titled Happily Ever After. Playing to her strengths of working with embellishments that range from zardozi, dori work, gota-patti, and burnished gold and silver work, the display that mirrored a store perfect for the needs of a neoteric yet traditional bride, Khanna divided her collection into four: ‘The Welcome Lunch’, ‘The Mehndi’, ‘The Cocktail’ and ‘The Wedding’.

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Pic Credit: FDCI (Instagram)

If one had to point out whether this was a rather experimental display as opposed to her past collections, well… that wouldn’t be an honest thing to say. From the Indo-western capes or the distinct drapes, the bandhgalas, or even the 3D flower embellishments on contemporary silhouettes, Khanna has not just been experimental but also always had an edge when it comes to her pieces. And this time was no different.

Pre-draped saris with old kinaris, lehengas with intrinsic threadwork, shararas and more, made this collection. She skipped the cape but went ahead for heavily-embroidered and structured long jackets. An emphasis was given on the dupatta, which was ornate yet lightweight. The hues ranged from pastels for ‘The Welcome Lunch’ to mustards and corals ‘The Mehndi’ collection. While ‘The Cocktail’ collection had a scattered yet bright colour palette of fuchsia and emeralds, ‘The Wedding’ obviously incorporated deep reds and ivory. One also saw a lot of blacks, thus reaffirming how the Indian bride is now willing to go beyond what society thinks is sartorially acceptable at ceremonies.

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